Centre for Research on Bilingualism

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High Court, South Africa, in English, Afrikaans and Xhosa. Photo: Caroline Kerfoot

    Welcome to the Centre for Research on Bilingualism!

    Bilingualism and second language acquisition is one of the leading research areas at Stockholm University. Research at the Centre covers a number of profile areas:

    • Second language acquisition/Swedish as a second language
    • Minority languages, language policy and language ideology in Sweden
    • L1 attrition and reactivation
    • Interpretation (and translation)
    • Transnational multilingualism in developing countries
    • Bilingual development, bilingual school programs, second language teaching, literacy
    • Young people’s language and language use in multilingual context

    At the Centre for Research on Bilingualism, we also offer a wide variety of introductory and advanced courses as well as a full PhD program.

    Omslag doktorsavhandling Guillermo Montero-Melis 2017

    Defence of doctoral thesis. Guillermo Montero-Melis: Thoughts in Motion

    On June 9th, Guillermo Montero-Melis will defend his thesis Thoughts in Motion. The Role of Long-Term L1 and Short-Term L2 Experience when Talking and Thinking of Caused Motion. Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism at Stockholm University.

    Niclas Abrahamsson och Emauel Bylund

    New research poject: A compensatory role for explicit/declarative memory in grammatical processing

    The Centre for Research on Bilingualism has been granted 3 900 000 SEK for the research project A compensatory role for explicit/declarative memory in grammatical processing: a combined latency, ERP, and tDCS study of nativelike second language acquisition

    Learning a new language changes the way you think about the world

    Studying multilinguals provides a unique opportunity for tackling the question of language and thought: If speakers of different languages think differently, what happens if you speak multiple languages?